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Paris-Jourdan Sciences Économiques - UMR8545





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PjSE - UMR8545
48 boulevard Jourdan
75014 Paris
France
Tél : 01 80 52 16 00
pjse AT ens.fr

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nom site cnrs ENS EHESS Ecole des Ponts ParisTech INRA Université Paris 1

Accueil du site > Séminaires > Agenda du 22 au 26 janvier 2018

Agenda du 22 au 26 janvier 2018

UMR8545

Lundi 22 janvier 2018

Régulation et environnement | 12:00-14:00
Salle R1-13, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
LEGROS Patrick : Come Together Now — Firm Boundaries and Delegation

Roy | 17:00-18:30
Salle R1-09, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
JEWITT Ian (Oxford) : Selecting from an Endogenous Pool of Applicants

Mardi 23 janvier 2018

Economie appliquée | 12:30-13:30
Salle R2-01, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
ROY Sutanuka (LSE) : Disruptive Effects of Preferential Policies : Evidence from Large Scale Field Experiments in India
Résumé

This paper reports on the first large-scale randomized field experiment (which includes 14,190undergraduate students) involving legally-recognized minorities to examine the causal effects ofproviding performance based financial incentives to disadvantaged students on high stakes universitytest scores. Two definitions of being disadvantaged are examined separately : 1) income disadvantage2) social disadvantage of belonging to minority groups, i.e., the lower caste groups. The aim ofthe paper is to measure the impact of two types of affirmative action policies on the disadvantagedgroups that the policies target and on the excluded relatively advantaged peers. When only poorstudents were given the opportunity to win the prize incentives, the average test scores of wholecohort decreased by .14 standard deviations. There is a negative spillover effect on the test scores ofthe nonpoor peers who are excluded from the opportunity to win the prize incentives. Mechanisms ofacademic non co-operation as a response to preferential policies are explored. The paper providesevidence of social tension and consequent non-cooperation among peers when only poor students areincentivized and majority of the peers, who happen to be non poor, are excluded.
Texte intégral [pdf]

Trade | 14:45-16:15
Salle H405, ScPo, 28 rue des Saints Pères, 75007 Paris
VAN BIESEBROECK Johannes (Leuven) : Comparative advantage in routine production
Co-authors : ARCHANSKAIA Liza ; WILLMANN Gerald
Texte intégral [pdf]

Paris Migration Seminar (PMS) | 16:30-19:30
Salle R1-13, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
Résumé

16h30 - 17h30 : Joshua Blumenstock : TBA
17h30 - 17h45 : Discussion (Fosca Giannotti)
17h45 - 18h15 : Coffee break
18h15 - 19h15 : Frédéric Docquier : Global warming , inequality and labor mobility (Joint with Michal Burzynski, Jim de Melo, Christoph Deuster)
19h15 - 19h30 : Discussion (Simone Bertoli).

PSI PSE | 17:00-18:00
Salle R2-20, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
BRIOLE Simon (PSE) : The effects of peers’ gender on students’ performance and academic career - evidence from natural variation in french middle school

Mercredi 24 janvier 2018

Histoire économique | 12:30-14:00
Salle R2-01, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
SALEH Mohamed (University of Stanford) : Socioeconomic Inequality across Religious Groups in the Middle East

Economie du développement | 16:30-18:00
Salle R2-01, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
BLUMENSTOCK Joshua (Berkeley) : Social Networks and Internal Migration
Résumé

How does the structure of an individual’s social network affect his or her decision to migrate ? Economic theory suggests two prominent mechanisms — as conduits of information about jobs, and as a safety net of social support — that have historically been difficult to differentiate. We bring a rich new dataset to bear on this question, which allows us to adjudicate between these two mechanisms and add considerable nuance to the discussion. Using the universe of mobile phone records of an entire country over a period of four years, we first characterize the migration decisions of millions of individuals with extremely granular quantitative detail. We then use the data to reconstruct the complete social network of each person in the months before and after migration, and show how migration decisions relate to the size and structure of the migrant’s social network. We use these stylized results to develop and estimate a structural model of network utility, and find that the average migrant benefits more from networks that provide social support than networks that efficiently transmit information. Finally, we show that this average effect masks considerable heterogeneity in how different types of migrants derive value from their social networks

Jeudi 25 janvier 2018

Comportement | 11:00-12:00
Salle R2-21, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
RAVESTEIJN BASTIAN (Harvard Medical School)

Travail et économie publique | 12:30-13:45
Salle R1-09, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
MONTALBAN CASTILLA José (Paris School of Economics) : Gender differences in response to stress

TOM | 12:30-13:30
Salle R2-20, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
BANERJEE Abhijit (MIT/JPAL/PSE) : The Efficient Deployment of Police Resources : Theory and New Evidence from a Randomized Drunk Driving Crackdown in India (with Esther Duflo and Dan Keniston)

Vendredi 26 janvier 2018

Casual Friday | 12:45-13:45
Salle R2-01, Campus Jourdan, 48 boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris
CRESPIN-BOUCAUD Juliette (PSE) : Intermarriage in sub-Saharan Africa : Ethnicity and religion

UMR8545